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Showing most liked content on 04/10/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Update - v2.068 - Update middle mouse camera movement! It is now fast and works well - Bot will bring a full summer pie if using multi-kill for up to 2 kills @theholyone - Bot will set higher camera angle if can't click on ornate pool @theholyone - Bot will now bank if inv full including loot @kevinbaker8888
  2. 1 point
    Suicide bot 10m/day safe These guide can work on free scripts and paid scripts (pay scripts recommended for better results) Requirement's 1.https://tribot.org/repository/script/id/123-auto-woodcutter/ script for woodcutting works well but can get you banned quickly or https://tribot.org/repository/script/id/136-master-chopper-aio/ only 9$ and abc10 will help alot! make way more profit with way less ban rate 2. A way to make a lot of accounts quickly i recommend this website emailfake dot com make a fake email copy it make an account with any password and confirm the email add it to the list 3.Tribot vip or vip-e Tutorial 1.Get all your accoutns ready on your account manager 2.start atleast 5 accounts and run a tutorial island script i recommend extutorials 3.once tutorial island is done run the free woodcutter and cut trees in varrock and bank you will start making small profit until you make 10k/h per account option 2 more profit (warning) abc 10 must be enabled start the woodcutting paid script and cut trees in draynor once in about 2 hours you will make 60 to 80k profit an hour per account once you hit level 21 switch to adamite or black axe and when you hit level 51 switch to rune axes 4.Make a break handler 6 hour runtime 1 hour randomness duration 10 hours randomness 2 hours 5. everytime you go to bed transfer all the wood or sell it for gold to your mule 6. once you hit 60 woodcutting switch to varrock yews make 100k/h per account (usually in 2 days) Profit/calculations 1. 10k/h for free script 10 account = 100k /h 100k/h times 6 hours = 600k/d 2.premium woodcutter trees (60k/h times 10 accounts = 600k/h) 600k/hour times 10 = 6m/day (more accounts = more profit) 3. Premium yews 100k/h per account times 10 account = 1m/h 1m/h times 10 = 10m/d 4.as you can see the more accounts the more profit this is an easy method and if your account gets banned just make another one takes minimum 30 min to setup the woodcutting and that is all If this worked for you please leave good feedback and tell me your results Update Planning to make a botting to green dragons guide
  3. 1 point
    Just very basics I learned before college but I guess understanding of how coding works does help. That script idea does sound like a good one. Can be done on lvl 3's and great for ironmen. Would be pretty simple too. Noted
  4. 1 point
    Thanks! Yeah coding is fun, I played with CSS / HTML at a really young age and fell in love with computers. In high school I took a computer science course where we programmed with liberty basic and now I'm in a software development college course. I really like it, and planned to start scripting for TRiBot when I started learning more so here I am. The orb runner sounds like something bigger, and I'll stick to simpler stuff for now until I'm more experienced.
  5. 1 point
    6 days loot tab. 99 defence, 99 range, 96 magic. Travel Method: Mounted Fairy Ring, Ornate Pool, Jewellery Box. Setup: Void - Blowpipe. Safe botting, only a few hours a day. - Been unlucky with rares, but oh well
  6. 1 point
  7. 1 point
    I have thousands of accounts in my account manager, just saying.
  8. 1 point
    Idk who this guy is or how I keep stumbling across his videos but I respect the man. It's easy to make fun of someone, but I am glad to see him getting support from people on his videos, and quite honestly, it is not a bad guide at all. Hope this dude gets a lot of subscribers
  9. 1 point
    Made a little simple Tribot Signature to be used as YOUR signature. Feel free to use it, k thx bye.
  10. 1 point
    Thats the point I was making, it wouldnt be!
  11. 1 point
    Don't get a blowpipe until 88 range. Get an Aramdyl crossbow if you can afford it, ruby (e) bolts at <85 and diamond (e) from 85-88.
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
    Yeah wait til a Jmod comes into your dream and cucks your account. Side note, i don't bot during Jagex hours.. lost too many good accounts doing that. Always be on the alert! I tend to babysit most of my accounts only going afk for maybe and hour or two, if of course i trust the script. It's the luck of the dice.
  14. 1 point
    your very right. I found an account of mine that was not on the correct mode and I changed it. now it works! thanks so much lol
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    @paintballer4lfe @CharlesEppes Seems like both of you manually interrupted the script while it was doing it's thing. Do not go to the bank and get your own items for the bot, as it needs to do everything itself. Start the bot and do not touch it. If you encounter a bug, please fill out the bug report form properly. Include a picture of your entire screen (including inventory setup). This will show me if you manually interfered with the bot and messed it up or not. Furthermore, try doing this if you are using LG or experiencing a random error:
  17. 1 point
    Glad to hear it! I hope it's going well for you? You hear that @TRiLeZ where's my cut? To summarise Prankxter, Oakdice obviously RWT"s & Skill Specs girlfriend owns a gold selling website called Divica Sales. But I feel it's not worth drawing attention to this as it's obvious for most of us at least the Oak Dice part & it comes across as the jealous ramblings of a small youtuber. It's kind of a catch 22 with a botting channel, I could show how to make 1B a month but it's not worth it you know? Back into the shadows Slightly off topic..... time for sleep.
  18. 1 point
    @Dakers011 Use the bump button instead of posting to bump the threads, thanks!
  19. 1 point
    Last account i had with this script hit 80 and never got banned. About to start using it again!
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Leaning Java with TRiBot - Variables Click Here for a List of All Tutorials If anyone would like to provide any advice or feedback on the tutorial, please message me on Skype. If you have questions about the tutorial, please feel free to comment on the thread, and I will do my best to answer your questions! Introduction As always, be sure that you read every line of this tutorial carefully. If you don't, you are going to find yourself very lost. When I tell you to stop and think about something, I'd definitely recommend that you listen! By now you should have read, and hopefully loosely understand, my 3rd tutorial. If you haven't, I would highly recommend doing so before reading this. Recap If you recall, a Java program consists of classes. The classes create objects, which are then controlled by methods. If this doesn't make any sense to you, you should review my previous tutorials. By now the above concepts should make at least some sense to you. If not, as always, feel free to message me on Skype (tacomanstan), or even better, post on the thread so others can benefit from your questions! What is a Variable? If you've taken any level of algebra at any time in your life, you probably already know what a variable is; x, y, z, a, b, c, etc. Those are some of the more commonly used variables in algebra, and they can be really annoying to keep track of. Luckily for us, Java isn't algebra! Yay! Variables in Java Right now you're feeling pretty confident, and you should! You've learned a lot in these last 3 tutorials. However, if you are like me, at this point you have something nagging at the back of your head: "How do I actually tell the program what an object is?" If you didn't understand what I meant by that question, that's okay. I'll explain to you the problem: When you want to make an object, you can visualize it in your head. You know what the object is, what it does, how it does it, what its purpose is, etc. How can you write code that will make the computer understand that object in the same way that you do? "CAN YOU HEAR ME?" Instances Let's pretend for a moment that we've made a Car class (recall that classes are in charge of making objects). We then use our Car class to create 5 cars. Each of those cars is called an instance. A good way to understand the concept of an instance is to look at World of Warcraft. In World of Warcraft, many dungeons are called "instance dungeons", or just "instances". When you enter these dungeons, you are entering a new instance of the dungeon. The only people in that dungeon are you and your party members. Let's look at a RuneScape related example: Worlds. Each world is an instance of RuneScape. You know how that works. You hop to a different world and almost everything is the same as the world that you just hopped from. Almost. There are obviously going to be differences between each world (number of players, for example), and those differences are what make understanding instances so important. Now let's go back to our car example. The most important thing to understand is that even though each car instance was created by the same class, each car might (and probably will) be completely different. Just like how each world in RuneScape has different things going on, the same applies to our cars: One car might be yellow, one might be blue. One might have a Michelin tires, one might have Good Year tires. One might be longer than the rest. One might 2 doors, another might have 4. The list goes on and on! Objects with Variables In Java, a variable that is part of an object is called an instance variable. Instance variables define the properties of an object. Just like how methods are in charge of doing something with an object, instance variables are in charge of defining what an object is. Think about a car. Think about all of the different parts of a car. Think about the characteristics of a car. You can also look at the picture above for some inspiration. Here's what I came up with as some examples: Steering wheel Wheels Color Engine Doors These are just a couple of things that make up a car. A car is incredibly complex, so there are many, many other things that you could have come up with. That list, as you probably guessed, is a list of instance variables. Instance variables can be anything that defines the object that they are part of. Notice how "color" and "wheels" are both on the list? While at first it might seem like those are completely different things, they really aren't. Think about it; a car has wheels, and a car has a color. One of those characteristics is more detailed than the other, but they are both characteristics of a car. Here you can see a modified Car class from my second tutorial: Variables in Methods Instance variables aren't the only types of variables in Java. Sometimes you need to use a variable in the same way that you would in algebra. For example, let's say you have a class called Rectangle. We have made 2 instance variables: width and height (remember these variables help define the rectangle). We have also made a method: getArea(). If you haven't already, try and think for a moment as to why I chose not to make an instance variable for the area of the rectangle. Actually think. Are you thinking? Stop reading. Stop it. Think! Alright well if you've made it this far you've either already thought, or you're just ignoring me. That's okay, let's just move on (you didn't hurt my feelings or anything). Hopefully that gave you enough time to at least try to think that through. If you couldn't think of anything, that's completely okay; most people couldn't think of anything either. As I'm sure you guessed, area is another variable! But wait, hold on a minute... It's not where width and height are. That's because area isn't an instance variable! Instead of being created as an instance variable, area was created as what is called a local variable inside of the getArea method. Local variables get their name because they are created inside of a specific method. A local variable is local to a certain method. So you're probably noticing how I still haven't answered the most important question: "Why isn't area an instance variable?" Look at the width and the height of a rectangle. Those are pretty obvious characteristics, right? In fact, they are the only two characteristics of a rectangle. You're probably thinking "What...? Then what is the area if it's not a characteristic?" To answer that, think about what you need to make a rectangle. All you need the width and the height. That's it. One you have the width and height, the width and height are then used to calculate the area of the rectangle. This makes the area of the rectangle a calculation instead of an instance variable. Useful Tip: If you are ever finding yourself wondering if something should be an instance variable or a calculation, think about it this way: If you set all of the instance variables in a class to a random value, would the resulting object still make sense? If the answer to that question is no, at least one of the instance variables you've chosen should be changed to be a calculation. For example, let's make area an instance variable, and try with a rectangle. I'll set each to a random value between 1 and 20. Here's what I got: width = 5 height = 17 area = 2 You should be able to see pretty quickly what the problem with that is. The area of a rectangle with a width of 5 and a height of 17 can never be 2. Making area an instance variable caused the rectangle to fail the "random value" test, so you know that area must be a calculation. Conclusion This is the end of the fourth installment of my Learning Java with TRiBot tutorial series. This session was all about learning what variables are, and the basics of how they are used in a program. At this point, we have gone through all of the aspects of a basic program. Congratulations! This is the last tutorial before you get to start writing code, and write your first program! If there is anything listed above that you would like a graphical representation of so you can visualize it better, please let me know and I will do my best to include it. If there is anything you don't understand, please let me know! If you didn't understand it, chances are someone else didn't either.
  22. 1 point
    It means it is working. The looking glass uses the OSBuddy client to hook to while TRiBot is being used. It is working.
  23. 1 point
    We know many of you use proxies. That's why we are introducing a new proxy system! This new system contains many improvements over the old one, making proxies easier to use, and making TRiBot more flexible. The new system includes: One Proxy Per TabInstead of having a global proxy for every instance of TRiBot, we are introducing "one proxy per tab," where users can specify a different proxy for every tab.Only RuneScape Connections Go Through the ProxyYou won't have to worry about the TRiBot server blocking connections from certain proxies. You also won't have to worry about scripts no showing up in the script selector after a while, script instances dying, or any of the common issues brought along by proxies. This is because connections to the TRiBot server no longer go through the proxy.This also means you won't be prompted for your TRiBot password anymore.User Ability to Change the ProxyDo you want to change the proxy while the client is already running? Right click on the tab and select "Set Proxy," then select the proxy you want to use.If you are logged in to the game, you will have to reconnect to RuneScape if you want to use the newly selected proxy.Integrated Support with the Client StarterThe Client Starter supports using a different proxy for every different tab.Looking Glass is SupportedThe proxy system supports Looking Glass. Cheers, TRiLeZ
  24. 1 point
    Leaning Java with TRiBot - Program Structure Click Here for a List of All Tutorials If anyone would like to provide any advice or feedback on the tutorial, please message me on Skype. I want to keep the comments to questions as much as I possibly can, so people can learn not only by reading the tutorial, but also reading the rest of the thread. Thank you! Introduction As always, be sure that you read every line of this tutorial carefully. If you don't, you are going to find yourself very lost. When I tell you to stop and think about something, I'd definitely recommend that you listen! By now you should have read, and hopefully loosely understand, my 1st tutorial. If you haven't, I would highly recommend doing so before reading this. Now then, let's get into it! In the previous tutorial I talked about how Java is an object oriented programming language, and the basics of what that means. You probably thought to yourself "that's super cool and everything, but I don't feel any closer to being able to write a script than I did when I started". I can only imagine your face right now. While you might feel that way, I can promise you that you have definitely made a huge step in the right direction! It's going to be a little while until you can apply what you learned, but I promise you, you are going to be glad that you learned it when you did! With that all said, let's get to the point. This installment is going to be all about the basics of how a program is put together. Overview Methods. Classes. Variables. Interfaces. Do those mean anything to you? You might be thinking "sure they do! they are all words!" If that's what you're thinking, you're in the same boat that most other people reading this is in. Congrats! Throw yourselves a yacht party, because that's going to be one big boat! Horrible jokes aside, the point is that you aren't alone in this. Lots of other guides you may or may not have tried to already read tend to throw these terms around like you're already a master at programming. Didn't feel very good, did it? So, let's backtrack a bit. How a Program Works As I mentioned in the previous tutorial, all programming really boils down to is telling the computer to do something, and the computer doing it for you. Ever stopped and thought about why the term is "programming language"? When you type code, you are literally telling the computer what to do. You are communicating with the computer. Parts of a Program Every programming language requires you to spell out what it is that you want the computer to do. For example, let's say that you want to write a woodcutting script. At some point in your program, you are going to write a line of code that tells the computer to chop down a tree. However, chopping a tree has multiple parts to it, right? What is the methodology you are going to use for chopping down the tree? Before you write any code, or learn anything else, I want you to think about that. Keep thinking until you have a general idea. It shouldn't take you more than a couple of seconds. Done thinking? Good. You should probably have been thinking something along the lines of this: find closest treewalk to closest treeclick closest tree That is an example methodology the script could use when chopping down a tree. Of course, that is an over-simplified example. You would also have things such as turning the camera, clicking the correct option, etc. The best advice I can give you when you're trying to figure out the methodology of something is to think about what you would do as an actual player when playing RuneScape, both physically and in your head; for example, finding the closest tree. That's something you do in your head, but is still incredibly important. Methods Before you can start linking together various parts of your methodology, you must first have them ready to be used. In Java, the term used to define part of a methodology makes perfect sense: a Method. That makes things easy to remember, doesn't it? Remember how Java uses objects? Methods are used to tell objects what to do and how to do it. Look back at the woodcutting example from the previous section. You can think of each line as a different method. Notice how each method describes what your player is doing? First, your player find the closest tree. Then your player walks to the closest tree. Then your player clicks the closest tree. Your player is the object, and what you are telling your player to do are the methods. Let's go back to the car example from the previous tutorial. What sort of methods would a car need to use? 90% or more of you probably won't, but I'll ask anyways: Stop for a moment and try to think of what a car might need to do. Here's what I came up with: AccelerateTurnReverseStopTurn OnTurn Off There are many more that you might have thought of, those are just some off of the top of my head. Let's look at another analogy. If you are still having a hard time grasping what a method is, pretend you are a teacher writing a homework assignment for his or her students. Your assignment must have instructions. You are going to be writing out the instructions on a piece of paper, and giving the instructions to your students. Now think of each step of your instructions as a method. The only difference is that when you are writing a Java method, you are writing in Java instead of English. That's all a method is; a set of instructions for an object to do. Classes I want you to take a step back, and I want you to breath. Why, you ask? This next step might be a bit confusing. If it is, that's okay. It's a lot to wrap your head around. This is going to be the last thing I cover before we dive into writing code! Remember back when I was talking about objects? A car is an object, a goat is an object, etc. Let's really start thinking about this for a moment. "A goat is an object". What is this statement saying, exactly? This is saying that each individual goat is an object. You're probably like "ok...?" I don't blame you, that seems like a really, really boring and anti-climactic statement. In reality, it's an important concept to understand. In the previous section you learned that methods make objects do something. You understand that you are going to be using methods to give objects instructions (if that isn't the case, re-read the previous section). However, it isn't clear where these methods "go". You know they are "attached to an object", but what does that even mean? Methods are a type of Java code. By now you should understand that. Objects, on the other had, are created by code. Again, "da fuq?" Okay, let's take another step back. Objects are created by the computer. Let's look at RuneScape for example, specifically at trees. There are, I don't know, a bazillion trees in RuneScape? Each tree is an object that was created by the computer. Each player is an object. Each monster is an object. But where did they come from? All objects are created by classes. A class contains a set of instructions that define what an object is and what it does, which you already know are called methods. In the outline above, you will see that the light green shows where the class is, and the yellow shows where the methods are. You can see how all of the methods are contained neatly within the class. This diagram is very similar to how a regular java class is laid out. In one of the next upcoming tutorials, you will learn how to use classes to create new objects. Simplification: An object is something created by a computer. The class is the instructions to the computer how to make that object. Conclusion This is the end of the second installment of my Learning Java with TRiBot tutorial series. This session was all about starting to get an idea of how a java program is structured. If there is anything listed above that you would like a graphical representation of so you can visualize it better, please let me know and I will do my best to include it. If there is anything you don't understand, please let me know! If you didn't understand it, chances are someone else didn't either. Click Here For Tutorial #3!
  25. 1 point
    Leaning Java with TRiBot - Primitive Basics Click Here for a List of All Tutorials If anyone would like to provide any advice or feedback on the tutorial, please message me on Skype. I want to keep the comments to questions as much as I possibly can, so people can learn not only by reading the tutorial, but also reading the rest of the thread. Thank you! Introduction As always, be sure that you read every line of this tutorial carefully. If you don't, you are going to find yourself very lost. When I tell you to stop and think about something, I'd definitely recommend that you listen! By now you should have read, and hopefully loosely understand, my 2nd tutorial. If you haven't, I would highly recommend doing so before reading this. What is a Primitive? Recall from my previous tutorial that Java is comprised of objects. Objects are created by classes, and controlled by methods. This is useful, of course, but what about much simpler ideas? What if you want to know something that is too simple to be an object, such as the height of a person? That is what primitives are for. Types of Primitives There are multiple types of primitives, but I am going to be focusing on only several of them in this tutorial. The rest are much less commonly used, and I will have a tutorial on them in the future. For now, let's just focus on the following. Int As you have probably guessed, int is short for "integer". An integer is a whole number. An integer can be positive, negative, or zero, but because it is a whole number, cannot ever be a fraction or decimal. Integers are used when a decimal or fraction doesn't make sense. One of the most common ways to use an integer is when you are counting something. If you are counting something, you usually want to count in whole numbers. For example, how many trees are in this picture? The answer is 3. There are 3 trees. Now, I know what some of you might be thinking; "what if there is a half of a tree?". The answer to that is as follows: Don't think that way. Take the following picture for example. While it's funny to say that there are 2.5 men here (the TV show reference which makes it even funnier), there are in fact 3 people in this picture. If you tell the computer that there are 2.5 people, the computer won't understand your humor, and will get incredibly confused and you will get a lot of nasty errors. Another Example: If you are still confused as to why you might need a value that can't be a fraction of decimal, look at the top of your browser window. How many tabs are open? 1? 2? 10? I can bet you that the number of tabs open in your browser is an integer! Aaaand Another Example: Sometimes integers aren't necessary, but they just make life easier. Take a look at your various skill XP values in RuneScape. Imagine how confusing it would be if you could have 32,392.382394 XP in a skill. Double Remember when I said that ints can't be decimals or fractions? As I'm sure you guessed, doubles can be! Doubles represent pretty much any number you can think of. If whatever you are trying to describe should be able to be a fraction or decimal, you should use a double. Here are some examples of doubles: 3.4, 1.0, 1932.2, 2.2912992, -2.1, -3291, 0.0. While integers are usually used to count things, doubles are most commonly used to define properties of things. These would be things like weight, height, the pull of gravity, etc. Boolean A boolean has one of two values: true or false. Booleans are sometimes the hardest primitive for people to understand the usefulness of. To help clarify things, I present to you the following educational image. When you select someone as being "hot" or as being "not", you are selecting a boolean. Is this person hot? True or false? When you select your answer, the program sets a boolean to "true" or "false" depending on what you select. Another Example: Open up pretty much any script on TRiBot that has a GUI. Chances are that there is at least one check box on that GUI. When you press "Start" on that GUI, the script will look at all of the check boxes and see if they are checked or not. How is this done? As you probably guessed, with a boolean! Char You won't be using characters very often (even for advanced programs it isn't very common), but because of their uniqueness, I will mention them briefly. Char stands for character. Characters are exactly that: characters. Anything on your keyboard is a character. Here are some examples: 'A', 'B', 'C', 'G', 'a', 'b', ' ', '%', '~', etc. Conclusion This is the end of the third installment of my Learning Java with TRiBot tutorial series. This session was all about learning the basics of what primitives are in Java. In the next tutorial, we will be diving right back into program structure! As I mentioned in my previous tutorials, if people seem interested in this concept, I'll probably make videos to go along with my written tutorials as well! Also, if there is anything listed above that you would like a graphical representation of so you can visualize it better, please let me know and I will do my best to include it. If there is anything you don't understand, please let me know! If you didn't understand it, chances are someone else didn't either. Click Here For Tutorial #4!
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